Our Favourite Romantic Places Around The World

When it comes to a romantic getaway all you really need is somewhere special and the one you love.  Of course, being in an extra special place certainly helps make the magic happen though!  We asked our team what their favourite romantic destinations were.  Here’s what they had to say.

Greece

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The two most romantic places in Greece in my opinion is Santorini and Mykonos. There is something magical about sitting down for supper and waiting for the most famous sunset around. In Mykonos there are so many places to explore. It is so easy to find a quite and quaint place to enjoy a romantic meal.

Karen Katelnikoff

Kapama Game Reserve South Africa

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Highlights:

  1. ALL the animals – what is more romantic than seeing Lions, Leopards and Giraffes by moonlight?
  2. A full spa with rooms facing a dry river bed where animals roam
  3. Beautiful “rustic” lodge rooms
  4. A full wine cellar
  5. Wonderful, locally prepared food and entertainment by firelight each night
  6. As places to propose go, this takes the cake (I should know 😊)

Jamie Milton

El dorado Casitas in the Mayan Riviera, Mexico

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If you’re looking for the perfect place to feel pampered and relaxed this is it!   I love staying at this gourmet inclusive resort where everything we could wish for is already thought of.  The tropical gardens are the perfect place to read a book or enjoy a cocktail.

Joanne Pidwerbetsky

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The top of the Reichstag Building Dome in Berlin at Sunset.

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Highlights:

  1. Capacity controlled, so never very crowded
  2. A beautiful 360 degree glass dome overlooking Berlin
  3. At sunset all the landmarks like the Brandenburg Gate are highlighted by the setting sun

Jamie Milton

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Italy

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It’s easy to understand why Italy is one of the most romantic places in the world.  Visiting this destination with my better half is something I’ll cherish forever.  It was our honeymoon spot and we fell in love with the beautiful hillsides of Tuscany, the gorgeous seaside towns and the Italian way of life to slow down and take it all in.  Toast your partner with some limoncello or vino and indulge in the beauty and romance of this eternal destination.  My heart is with the wonderful Italian people who are struggling through difficult times.  I know one day we will return.

Czarina Sastaunik

The Sydney Zoo at Sunset.

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Highlights:

  1. There is a lookout where you can watch the sun set over Sydney Harbour
  2. Beautiful views of the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House
  3. Take a romantic boat right from the Zoo back across the Harbour to your hotel after

Jamie Milton

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Disney Parks

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We’ve all heard of the “Magic of Disney”.  I’m sure many people think it’s not real but I’m here to argue that it is real and it what romance is made of!   My partner and I have visited both Disneyland and Walt Disney World together as childless millennials (how dare we) and both trips had an element of romance that surprised me.  There’s something about the atmosphere that encourages hand holding.  Maybe at first it’s so that you don’t lose each other but eventually it is because the magic that they pump into the air makes you appreciate each other more.   Sharing the experience of rides, meeting favourite characters, marvelling at how things were created, fireworks shows and delicious dining is like the ultimate date every day.  Plus having access to photo pass photographers means you can get so many cute photos of the whole ordeal!  For me, a Disney trip is all about the romance and I just cannot wait for us to get back there to let the magic take over again.

Heather Peters


We hope you enjoyed our list of romantic places.   As you can see, romance can be found anywhere around the world – it’s about finding those special moments with the person you love wherever you are.

Where have you found romance around the world?

Sailing The British Isles with Ed Buchholz on Cunard’s Queen Victoria | All About Glasgow, Scotland

Hosted Cruise – Cunard Queen Victoria – 12 Nights
June 7 – 19, 2020
British Isles

Port of Call – Glasgow (Tours from Greenock), Scotland – June 14

Glasgow is a city of architectural grandeur, with a trademark flair for design. Start right in the heart of the city centre and stumble upon one elegant street after another, each lined with some of the UK’s best-preserved Victorian architecture. In such a compact city it’s easy to visit the neighbourhoods, each bursting with their own character and charm.

Hailed as one of the driving forces behind the city’s rejuvenation, Glasgow’s art scene is unfussy and open to all. Named as the UK’s Top Cultural and Creative City (European Commission 2019), Glasgow is home to one of Europe’s largest civic art collections, much of which is free to visit in the city’s museums and galleries. Art spills out beyond venue walls in the form of neighbourhood festivals and urban street art adorning the sides of buildings, which can be experienced as part of a mural trail.

When Time Out Magazine named Glasgow as one of their ‘top ten best destinations in the world for 2019’, they also named the city as ‘first for friendliness’. People really do make Glasgow. From taxi drivers to tour guides, whether chatting to creators at weekend markets or to locals in whisky bars – you’ll discover a distinctive personality that is rooted in earthy Scottishness and energized with a progressive urban outlook. Glasgow’s heritage is all around. It’s in museums and city tours, it’s in hidden gems and restaurants, and it’s in the people’s natural ability to tell their story with trademark wit and warmth.

Scotland’s stunning scenery seeps into Glasgow in rolling hills, expansive country parks, woodland walks and even Highland cattle. Take in the Victorian extravagance of the Park Circus tenements, the gothic brilliance of the Glasgow Necropolis or the leafy tree-lined Queen’s Park and you’ll find scenic viewpoints overlooking the city, showing just why Glasgow is known as the Dear Green Place in Gaelic. You’ll find some of the city’s top attractions and museums within beautiful parkland settings and just ten minutes from the buzzing city centre is the tranquil Forth and Clyde Canal.

Top Attractions:

Glasgow Cathedral:  Glasgow Cathedral has a rare timelessness. The dark, imposing interior conjures up medieval might and can send a shiver down the spine. It’s a shining example of Gothic architecture, and unlike nearly all of Scotland’s cathedrals, it survived the turmoil of the Reformation mobs almost intact. Most of the current building dates from the 15th century.

image001Entry is through a side door into the nave, hung with regimental colours. The wooden roof has been restored many times since its original construction, but some of the timber dates from the 14th century; note the impressive shields. Many of the cathedral’s stunning, narrow stained-glass windows are modern; to the left is Francis Spear’s 1958 work The Creation, which fills the west window.

The cathedral is divided by a late-15th-century stone choir screen, decorated with seven pairs of figures perhaps representing the seven deadly sins. The four stained-glass panels of the east window, depicting the Apostles (also by Francis Spear), are particularly evocative. At the northeastern corner is the entrance to the 15th-century upper chapter house, where the University of Glasgow was founded. It’s now used as a sacristy.

The most interesting part of the cath­edral, the lower church, is reached by a stairway. Its forest of pillars creates a powerful atmosphere around the tomb of St Mungo (who founded a monastic community here in the 6th century), the focus of a famous medieval pilgrimage that was believed to be as meritorious as a visit to Rome.

Glasgow Necropolis:  Behind Glasgow Cathedral, this sizeable 19th-century necropolis stretches picturesquely up and over a green hill. The elaborate Victorian tombs of the city’s wealthy industrialists, several of them designed by prominent architects of the day (including Alexander Thomson and Charles Rennie Mackintosh), make for an intriguing stroll and offer great views and a vague Gothic thrill.

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George Square:  George Square is the main city square in central Glasgow. It was laid out in 1781 and named after King George III. It is notable for several important statues and monuments such as those dedicated to Robert Burns, James Watt, William Gladstone, Queen Victoria, and Sir Walter Scott. You’ll also find the Glasgow City Chambers along the east side of the square. It is a common meeting place in the city.

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The Gallery of Modern Art:  The Gallery of Modern Art is located in the center of the city and is the most visited modern art gallery in Scotland. It has changing exhibitions of modern art from both local and international artists. The building itself has an interesting history, originally built in 1778 for wealthy tobacco merchant William Cunninghame. The art museum is free to visit.

In front of the art museum is one of Glasgow’s most iconic landmarks, the Equestrian Statue of the Duke of Wellington. The interesting thing about the statue is the long-running placement each evening of a traffic cone on the top of the Duke’s head or his horse’s head (or both!). This long-running prank shows you a little of the local humor and character of Glaswegians.

 

The Lighthouse:  As Scotland’s Centre for Design and Architecture, it serves as a visitor center, exhibition space, and events venue in central Glasgow. The building was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh—his first public commission—and formerly was the headquarters of The Glasgow Herald.

Mackintosh is probably the most famous Scottish architect and designer of the 20th century and is known for being influential as a creator of the Glasgow Style. There is a Mackintosh exhibition here, temporary art exhibitions and events, a gift shop, information center, and even a viewing gallery with a good view of the city.

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Tennent’s Brewery: Tennent’s is a popular Glasgow beer brand and its pale lager beer is known as “Scotland’s favourite pint”. If you are not familiar with it, you’ll probably start to notice all the red T’s in the restaurants and bars carrying its beer while in Scotland. Wellpark Brewery in Glasgow was founded in 1740 and today you can take a guided tour of the brewery to learn about Tennent’s history, brewing process, packing and distribution, and of course taste the beer.

It has a well-organized and informative tour that ends with a generous beer tasting. The museum and sample room is a fun place to look around before or after the tour, having lots of memorabilia on display such as the famous “Lager Lovelies” cans. Note that guests must be wearing closed flat shoes suitable for walking around a work environment, be able to climb stairs.

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Does this amazing sailing through the British Isles sound like your dream trip?  Reach out to the team at Uniglobe Carefree Travel Group in Saskatoon at 306-242-TRIP to reserve your cabin today!

Sailing The British Isles with Ed Buchholz on Cunard’s Queen Victoria | All About Stornoway, Scotland

Hosted Cruise – Cunard Queen Victoria – 12 Nights
June 7 – 19, 2020
British Isles

Port of Call – Stornoway, Scotland – June 12

Located in the Western Isles of Scotland is a fascinating town called Stornoway. With a history dating back many centuries, a beautiful setting and much to please the eye, Stornoway of Lewis is well worth a visit.

Stornoway is said to have begun as a Viking settlement that progressively grew in a lovely natural harbor. The town’s name is believed to come from the word ‘Stjornavgr’, which means “Steering Bay” in Norse. Sometime in the 1100s a castle was built proudly overlooking the town by the MacNicol family. Stornoway Castle was annexed by Leod, predecessor to the MacLeods of Lewis. The Middle Ages saw much fighting amongst Scottish clans and the MacLeod family was much despised by the government in Edinburgh. King James VI attempted to remove their influence in 1597, but did not succeed. In the 1600s the castle of Stornoway was crushed by forces led by Oliver Cromwell. The town came under control of the MacKenzies.

As time progressed, Stornoway town saw the rising of buildings, a port and other developments. In 1844 the area of Lewis, including Stornoway was bought by Sir James Matheson. Matheson was responsible for the construction of Lewis Castle. Then in 1918, Lewis was sold to Lord Leverhume.

Today, Stornoway is a popular tourist destination. A busy little town with a bustling harbor, visitors to Stornoway will have a delightful adventure. The town is a doorway to the island of Lewis and its many attractions dating far back in history. Stornoway itself offers sightseers plenty to view including the Stornoway Town Hall, Lewis Castle, the arts center and Lewis Loom Center. Many streets have been made available only for use by pedestrians. Around the town center, visitors will discover pleasant stores including those which sell Harris Tweed.

Located on the castle grounds you will find Stornoway Golf Club. Interestingly, this is the only golf course in the Outer Hebrides with 18 holes.

Top Attractions:

The Narrows:  Start in the centre of town and stroll these pedestrian streets.  There are plenty of shops to browse here, as well as pubs, butchers, the local art gallery, and the Stornoway Town Hall.  On a sunny day you could be mistaken for thinking you were somewhere more tropical, thanks to the brightly painted facades of the buildings!

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Lews Castle:  The Castle started life in the 1680s as Seaforth Lodge; it wasn’t until Sir James Matheson bought the land in 1840 that construction began on the building that we image004know today, using the fortune Matheson had amassed through his role in the opium trade. (In short, the Castle was basically built with drug money from China – how’s that for a bit of scandalous local history?)

Lord Leverhulme bought the island in 1918, modernizing the Castle further, before the building and the land surrounding it came into public ownership in the Twenties. Since then it’s been a WW II naval hospital, student accommodation, and even lain derelict. After extensive renovations, the Castle reopened this year, providing a home for the local museum, a café, shop, and the latest addition to the luxury accommodation line-up of Natural Retreats: it’s now a must-see on any visit to Stornoway.

Castle Grounds:  Outside the castle, you’ll find sprawling grounds that are ideal for taking a stroll.  You’ll find many people taking their dogs on woodland walks around the vast 270 hectares of trails and pathways that follow the River Creed as it winds its way down towards the mouth of the harbour. Listen for the sound of herons and if lucky, you will also spot seals in the waters.

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Museum Nan Eilean:  A modern extension built to the back of Lews Castle holds the Islands museum which, is funded by Western Isles Council (Comhairle nan Eilean Siar) among others. The museum offers an interactive insight into the culture, history and diversity of life for those living on the Islands, from prehistory to present day. The museum also features artifacts from history, some of the infamous Lewis chessmen, to more the current Nike and Vivienne Westwood tweed collaborations.

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Ready to dive in and join this amazing sailing through the British Isles?  Reach out to the team at UNIGLOBE Carefree Travel Group in Saskatoon at 306-242-TRIP today!

Sailing The British Isles with Ed Buchholz on Cunard’s Queen Victoria | All About Dublin

Hosted Cruise – Cunard Queen Victoria – 12 Nights
June 7 – 19, 2020
British Isles

Port of Call – Dublin, Ireland – June 10

Dublin has been in the news since the 9th century, and while traces of its Viking past have been largely washed away, the city is a living museum of its history since then, with medieval castles and cathedrals on display alongside the architectural splendours of its 18th-century heyday, when Dublin was the most handsome Georgian city of the British Empire and a fine reflection of the aspirations of its most privileged citizens. How power was wrested from their hands is another story, and you’ll learn that one in its museums and on its walking tours.

The pub remains the alpha and omega of social interaction in Dublin. The city’s relationship with alcohol is complex and conflicted but, at its very best, the pub is the perfect social lubricant and one of the highlights of a visit to Dublin. Every Dubliner has their favourite haunt, from the never-changing traditional pub to whatever new opening is bringing in people. With more than 1000 of them spread about the city, you’ll be spoilt for choice.

For as long as it’s been around, Dublin has looked beyond Irish shores for inspiration. Once the second city of the (British) Empire, Dublin has always maintained a pretty cosmopolitan outlook and in the last three decades has conspicuously embraced diversity and multiculturalism. You’ll hear languages and eat foods from all four corners of the globe.

Top Attractions:

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Irish Pubs:  With over a thousand pubs in Dublin, it’s not hard to find one and you’ll enjoy the warm Irish hospitality.  A couple famous pubs include:

  • John Mulligan’s – This brilliant old boozer is a cultural institution, established in 1782 and in this location since 1854. A drink (or more) here is like attending liquid services at a most sacred, secular shrine. John F Kennedy paid his respects in 1945, when he joined the cast of regulars that seems barely to have changed since.
  • The Hairy Lemon Pub – Traditional Irish music, or trad, is one reason many people visit Ireland. And The Hairy Lemon Pubis certainly unconventional… you never know what you’ll find in this aptly-named green and yellow 19th-century house. One thing is for sure, The Hairy Lemon does the best Trad Sessions in Dublin! If you have never been to an Irish Trad Session, prepare yourself for an unusual experience, it can get pretty wild especially when the Guinness is flowing. The Hairy Lemon is also known for their traditional Irish food like Dublin Coddle, Cottage Pie and Irish Stew.

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Trinity College:  Created in 1592, Trinity College is Ireland’s oldest university, hosting students such as author Bram Stoker, poet Oscar Wilde and Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels.  The building has also been home to the ancient Book Of Kells since 1661. The Book of Kells Exhibition in Trinity College is a must-see in Dublin.  The Old Library houses 200,000 ancient books in beautiful oak bookcases, which is why J.K. Rowling used it as inspiration for Hogwarts in Harry Potter! The library is one of the most popular Instagram spots in Dublin too.

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Guiness Storehouse:  The most popular visit in town is this multimedia homage to Guinness in a converted grain storehouse that is part of the 26-hectare brewery. Across its seven floors you’ll discover everything about Guinness before getting to taste the brew in the top-floor Gravity Bar, with panoramic views. The floor directly below has a very good restaurant.

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Kilmainham Gaol:  If you have any desire to understand Irish history – especially the long-running resistance to British rule – then a visit to this former prison is an absolute must. A threatening grey building, built in 1796, it’s played a role in virtually every act of Ireland’s painful path to independence, and even today, despite closing in 1924, it still has the power to chill.

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St. Patrick’s Cathedral: Founded in 1191, St. Patrick’s Cathedral is the largest church in Ireland, and the National Cathedral. It has been said this is where St. Patrick himself baptized Christian converts over 1500 years ago.  Unusually, St. Patrick’s isn’t the only Cathedral in Dublin. It’s a “two-cathedral” city, sharing the title with Christ Church Cathedral nearby. The writer Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, was once Dean of the cathedral. He’s buried there too.

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Glasnevin Cemetery: Built in 1832, Dublin’s Glasnevin Cemetery is surrounded by seven watchtowers which were home to armed guards. Ireland’s most famous cemetery was a key target for bodysnatchers!  It was also the final resting place for many historical figures like Michael Colins, a soldier and politician who played a key role in the struggle for Irish independence, Brendan Behan, Irish poet, novelist, and playwright who was imprisoned for IRA activity and Luke Kelly, vocalist in one of Ireland’s greatest bands, The Dubliners.  Nowadays, Glasnevin Cemetery Museum has vowed to tell the stories of over 1.5 million people, the people who helped to shape the Ireland of today. They also have the best tools for your family’s Irish genealogy search.

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There are many more wonderful sights to see in Dublin, including the Ha’Penny Bridge, Oscar Wilde Statue, Howth Cliff Walk, St, Michen Church Mummies and so much more.  This will be a magnificent port of call on this cruise!  Don’t miss out!


Ready to dive in and join this amazing sailing through the British Isles?  Reach out to the team at UNIGLOBE Carefree Travel Group in Saskatoon at 306-242-TRIP today!

Ed’s Cruise from London to New York on the Silversea Whisper – Part 4

St Pierre et Miquelon – October 5

How many of you knew that just a few miles south of Newfoundland there are a couple of islands owned by France?  The islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon aren’t just French-like with their berets, baguettes and Bordeaux – they are France, governed and financed by the tricolore. Locals kiss their hellos and pay in euros, sweet smells waft from myriad pastry shops, and French cars crowd the tiny one-way streets. It’s a world away from Newfoundland. St-Pierre is the more populated and developed island, with most of its 5500 residents living in the town of St-Pierre.  Miquelon is larger geographically but has only 600 residents overall.

Jacques Cartier claimed the islands for France in 1536, after they were discovered by the Portuguese in 1520. At the end of the Seven Years’ War in 1763, the islands were turned over to Britain, only to be given back to France in 1816. And French they’ve remained ever since.

As we land in St Pierre by tender, we are greeted by the locals dressed in period costumes and are offered coffee and wonderful French pastries.  In heavily accented English, they explain the series of brightly coloured shacks called Les Salines.  Formerly used to store salt, salted fish and fishing gear, these colorful little cabins located on the coast are now used to protect artisanal fishers’ equipment. Primarily a scenic cluster of multihued fishing shacks.

We then headed toward the Saint-Pierre harbor to see the Pointe aux Canons Lighthouse. While the lighthouse itself wasn’t open for the public, there’s a jetty where you can take photos. There’s also the remnants of a cannon here that was used during the Crimean War.

As we walk into the downtown area, we pass Le Square Joffre. You can’t miss the sculpture of a sailor that overlooks this peaceful park. This statue, erected in 1964, was sculpted out of a block of granite and is dedicated to the many sailors who lost their lives at sea. During the Sailors’ Festival, the procession stops there to lay flowers at its base.

The balance of the day is spent wandering around the small town.  Some of the people, again dressed in period costume, danced in a square to a local 3 piece band.  What surprised me is that we found a couple of large wine stores there that carried an impressive amount of French wines for a rather small population of 5,000.

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Finally, we went to the local church.  Once a wooden church, it was ravaged by fire and rebuilt with concrete and stone.

That’s it for now…next stop…Sydney, Nova Scotia!

Czarina’s Getaway to Sweden – Part 2

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Travelling further north in Sweden is like travelling further north in Saskatchewan… Everything gets a little greener with dense forests and you are surrounded by beautiful lakes. It never gets completely dark here, even when you are still adjusting to the time change at 3am.

The journey to the wedding required a stop in the beautiful city of Gavle. A small, historic city with a river running through it and amazing gardens surround everything! As we walked the river path, we passed Gavle’s lovely concert hall, Konserthus. Sweden is home to some of the best music acts around. We happened to be here during a heavy metal festival. Sadly, I left my leather pants at home.

Walking around can make a gal hungry. Thankfully, we found a riverfront restaurant called Bryggan. I was pleasantly surprised by the view, food and service. Everything is a bit high on the cost side in Sweden but the mussels and fries were amazing! Swedes have it made with delicious seafood. Highly recommend this place.

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After a night in Gavle, we journeyed on to Hogbo, the sight of the wedding. Hogbo is a nature lover’s paradise! The Swedes love adventure and Hogbo has many biking and hiking trails, mini golf, beach area with beautiful lake, tennis and more. It felt like their version of Waskesiu. There was plenty to keep busy at the resort Hogbo Brukshotell! I’m not much for “roughing it” so I’m sure glad we were in the main hotel compared to the cabins which were a fair distance from the ceremony and reception sight. Unfortunately, mosquitos there enjoy Canadian blood too but it didn’t stop me from working on my tan! The weather was been perfect there.

What to expect from a Swedish-Canadian wedding? Lots of cheer, drinks and singing! The Swedes attending wished the happy couple best wishes with lots of Swedish songs. It’s a beautiful tradition that Swedes incorporate into every wedding. The couple looked beautiful and we were blessed with a fabulous sunny day!

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A great way to end our beautiful adventure! Back to reality…


Interested in planning your own trip to Sweden or Amsterdam?  Czarina would love to help!  You can reach her by calling 306-934-3400 or emailing czarina@uniglobevacation.com.

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Czarina’s Getaway to Sweden – Part 1

Not everything can go smoothly on every trip. On this trip I learned the value of packing a good carry on with all the essentials when I learned that my checked luggage did not make it on my direct flight from Amsterdam to Stockholm. Did Scandinavian Airlines give me a reason for the loss? No. Was I going to let it ruin my Swedish experience? Heck no! So I filed a baggage complaint at the airport, called my insurance provider and carried on with my day.

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Sweden is a beautiful, lush and sunny destination filled with the most beautiful people! Everyone looks like a super model. There are some good genes in these parts. The terrain here really reminds me of home. I forget sometimes how far North we are.

We are staying near the Stockholm Central Train Station in the heart of their central business district. Convenient if you are dragging your luggage off the direct train from the airport. Not me though!

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My first goal is to view the Royal Palace and hopefully catch a glimpse of Europe’s best looking royal, Prince Carl of Sweden! Just a short walk from the downtown core is the area known as Gamla Stan best known as their historical area. This is where the Royal Palace is located and where I find my first taste of Nordic eateries. The Palace is grand and opulent with beautiful views of the waterways. Sadly, no Prince Carl but we do get to meet a friendly castle guard who kindly allows us to take a selfie with him!

 

Sweden is so ahead of the game. A lot of businesses do not accept cash at all. This is a destination where you must prepare to swipe your card everywhere you go for every purchase. Leading to large bills as it is expensive! But when in Sweden, you must do as the Swedish do… We had a wonderful evening having drinks and delicious appetizers at a local bistro called Osterlanggatan 17 Bar & Kvarterskrog. Friendly service matched with great dining in old town was everything I needed after the long day I had.

My luggage finally made it after a 24 hour adventure and I am so very thankful. I need everything in there as we travel further north to an area called Gavle. This small quaint city is home to my dear friends who are getting married in the next few days. Can’t wait to experience a Swedish/Canadian hybrid wedding!